Women in Prison - Netflix

Women in Prison is a docu-series that airs on Investigation Discovery. Indiana Women's Prison houses 600 inmates with maximum security and is the backdrop for this cast of surprisingly relatable and bold characters. A real-life version of "Orange Is the New Black," the program explores the lives of women who, often after one tragic misstep, end up on the wrong side of the law. Featuring profiles on a suburban soccer mom, a high school art teacher and a Preacher's daughter, these unlikely convicts confess to their shocking crimes and reveal how they've learned to survive in this hostile, alien environment.

This genre-breaking format features two women in each episode and mixes the reality of prison life with dramatic recreations of how each of the characters ended up behind bars. As viewers get to know these women, they will be desperate to learn what crimes each committed, culminating in a shocking revelation at the very end of each episode.

Women in Prison - Netflix

Type: Documentary

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2015-06-11

Women in Prison - LGBT people in prison - Netflix

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) prisoners often face additional challenges compared to heterosexual and cisgender prisoners. According to Just Detention International, LGBT inmates are “among the most vulnerable in the prison population”. 67% of LGBT prisoners in California report being assaulted while in prison. The vulnerability of LGBT prisoners has led some prisons to separate them from other prisoners, while in others they are housed with the general population. While much of the available data on LGBT inmates comes from the United States, Amnesty International maintains records of known incidents internationally in which LGBT prisoners and those perceived to be lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender have suffered torture, ill-treatment and violence at the hands of fellow inmates as well as prison officials.

Women in Prison - Physical and sexual abuse - Netflix

According to Amnesty International, globally, LGBT prisoners and those perceived to be LGBT, are at risk of torture, ill-treatment and violence from other inmates as well as prison officials. Amnesty International cites numerous cases internationally where LGBT inmates are known to have been abused or murdered by prison officials or fellow inmates. Statistics show that 59% of transgender women in male prisons had been sexually assaulted while incarcerated compared to the 4% of the male-identified population. Transgender women in male prisons also deal with the risk of forced prostitution by both prison staff and other prisoners. Forced prostitution can occur when a correction officer brings a transgender woman to the cell of a male inmate and locks them in so that the male inmate can rape her. The male inmate will then pay the correction officer in some way and sometimes the correction officer will give the woman a portion of the payment. "[P]risoners fitting any part of the following description are more likely to be targeted: young, small in size, physically weak, gay, first offender, possessing “feminine” characteristics such as long hair or a high voice; being unassertive, unaggressive, shy, intellectual, not street-smart, or “passive”; or having been convicted of a sexual offense against a minor. Prisoners with any one of these characteristics typically face an increased risk of sexual abuse, while prisoners with several overlapping characteristics are much more likely than other prisoners to be targeted for abuse." Gay and bisexual men are often assumed to be responsible for the preponderance of sexual assaults perpetrated in prisons as has been reflected in various American judicial decisions. For example, in Cole v. Flick the court upheld the right of prisons to limit the length of inmates' hair, claiming that allowing them to wear long hair could lead to an increase in attacks by “predatory homosexuals”. In Roland v. Johnson, the court described “gangs of homosexual predators”. And Ashann-Ra v. Virginia contains references to “inmates known to be predatory homosexuals [stalking] other inmates in the showers”. According to a study by Human Rights Watch, however, “The myth of the 'homosexual predator' is groundless. Perpetrators of rape typically view themselves as heterosexual and, outside of the prison environment, prefer to engage in heterosexual activity. Although gay inmates are much more likely than other inmates to be victimized in prison, they are not likely to be perpetrators of sexual abuse.” (see also situational homosexuality) A related problem is that there is a tendency, among both prison officials and prisoners, to view victimization as proof of homosexuality: “The fact of submitting to rape—even violent, forcible rape—redefines [a prisoner] as 'a punk, sissy, queer.'” Officials sometimes take the view all sex involving a gay prisoner is necessarily consensual, meaning that victims known or perceived to be gay may not receive necessary medical treatment, protection, and legal recourse, and perpetrators may go unpunished and remain able to perpetrate abuse on their victims:

According to Andrea Cavanaugh Kern, a spokesperson for Stop Prisoner Rape, the combination of high rates of sexual assault against gay prisoners and high rates of HIV infection in the prison population is “a life-or-death issue for the LGBT community”. While much of the data regards male prisoners, according to Amnesty International, “perceived or actual sexual orientation has been found to be one of four categories that make a female prisoner a more likely target for sexual abuse”.

I have been sexually assaulted twice since being incarcerated. Both times the staff refused to do anything except to lock me up and make accusations that I'm homosexual.

Women in Prison - References - Netflix