Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles - Netflix

The mother of all destiny. Her son, the future leader of mankind. Their protector, a Terminator from the future. Together they must take back the future as Sarah Connor prepares her son to fight the war against machines determined to annihilate the human race. The clock is ticking. Can they stop Judgment Day?

Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2008-01-13

Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles - Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles - Netflix

Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles (sometimes abbreviated as Terminator: TSCC or simply TSCC) is an American science fiction television series that aired on Fox from January 2008 to April 2009. The show was produced by Warner Bros. Television, and C2 Pictures (C2 Pictures was replaced by The Halcyon Company in season two). It is a spin-off from the Terminator series of films. It revolves around the lives of the fictional characters Sarah and John Connor, following the events of Terminator 2: Judgment Day, and ignoring the events of the 2003 sequel Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines and the following installments. The series premiered on Sunday, January 13, 2008, on the U.S. television network Fox. Production for the series was provided by the Judgment Day and Rise of the Machines producers and C2 Pictures, Sony Pictures Entertainment (International) co-presidents Mario Kassar and Andrew G. Vajna, C2 Senior Vice President James Middleton, David Nutter and Josh Friedman, who not only served as executive producer but also wrote the script for the first two episodes. The show opened mid-season with a shortened run of nine episodes, January through March 2008. It was the highest-rated new scripted series of the 2007–08 television season and was renewed for a second season, which began on September 8, 2008, and ended April 10, 2009 (The same year Warner Bros. and the Halcyon Company produced McG's Terminator Salvation). On May 18, 2009, despite fan efforts, Fox Entertainment president Kevin Reilly announced Fox would not renew the show for a third season.

Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles - Critical reception - Netflix

On Metacritic, a review aggregator which assigns a normalized score out of 100 to each review, the first season currently holds an average score of 74 based on 24 reviews. The second season has a score of 67, based on only 4 reviews. USA Today gave the premiere episode four and a half stars out of five, calling the series, “smart, tough and entertaining.” The New York Times referred to it as “one of the more humanizing adventures in science fiction to arrive in quite a while”, while the Los Angeles Times declared the show “has heart and feeling” and “an almost Shakespearean exploration of fate vs. character” that features “plenty of really great fight scenes, and explosions, as well as neat devices developed in the future and jury-rigged in the present.” In addition, film industry journal Daily Variety declared the series pilot “a slick brand extension off this profitable assembly line” that showcases “impressive and abundant action with realistic visual effects and, frankly, plenty of eye candy between Glau and Headey.” At the start of the second season, Variety praised “Headey's gritty performance as Sarah—managing to be smart, resourceful and tough, yet melancholy and vulnerable as well” and that the Chronicles “continue to deliver”, getting “considerable mileage out of the constant peril” facing the characters. The Connecticut Post placed it on its list of the top 10 TV shows of 2008: “It's smart, with thought-provoking meditations on parenthood, destiny and human nature, and features good performances by Lena Headey, as Sarah, and Summer Glau.” Not all response was positive. The Futon Critic, in a June 14, 2007 review of the pilot episode, declared “it's actually far more ingrained into the Terminator mythology than you'd expect,” but stated “this installment feels less like a 'pilot' and more like an excuse to rearrange the deck chairs on the 'Terminator' franchise to potentially have a TV show.” One negative report from La Lámina Corredora reported “the pilot feels too much like a cheap remake of T2.” Tim Goodman of the San Francisco Chronicle derided the entire conceptualization and production of the series. Though limited to his viewing of the first two episodes, Goodman leveled criticism against Fox for having “taken the wholly predictable course of putting a lot of money into explosions and regenerating cyborgs” but not having “paid much attention to plot, casting or writing.” In its review of the second season, IGN felt despite a few middling episodes and the restrictions of a TV budget, “[the series] turned out to be intelligent, complex and consistently operated on a deeper emotional level than anyone could have expected.” Looking back on the series, Alan Sepinwall of The Star-Ledger was disappointed by Sarah and John as well as the sluggish pace of the show; however, he felt these weaknesses were outweighed by the strength of the performances of Summer Glau, Brian Austin Green and Garret Dillahunt as well as the writers' commitment to showing the emotional toll on the characters. Commenting on the final episode of season two, he called it a “terrific” finale which took the show in a new potential-filled direction. In May 2009 the show won the E!Online “Save One Show” poll, and has received positive coverage from places such as Wired and CNN. In an effort to keep the series on the air, fans created support communities on Facebook and MySpace and uploaded videos to YouTube. Creator Josh Friedman confirmed to CliqueClack that he has vowed to never reveal how the series would have progressed or ended.

Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles - References - Netflix