School Pride - Netflix

In NBC's School Pride TV show, cameras will follow students, teachers and parents as they motivate their community to renovate the school. Making use of local businesses and skilled local labor, the community will make over classrooms, public spaces, art and music halls, and athletic facilities in School Pride (NBC TV show). The work will include everything from re-painting and re-carpeting to improving the utilities, and updating the technology systems of the school.

School Pride - Netflix

Type: Reality

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2010-10-15

School Pride - White pride - Netflix

White pride is a motto primarily used by white separatist, white nationalist, neo-Nazi and white supremacist organizations in order to signal racist or racialist viewpoints. It is also a slogan used by the prominent post-Ku Klux Klan group Stormfront and a term used to make racist/racialist viewpoints more palatable to the general public who may associate historical abuses with the terms “white nationalist”, “neo-Nazi”, and “white supremacist”.

School Pride - Use as an identity marker - Netflix

Political and social scientists commonly argue that the idea of “white pride” is an attempt to provide a clean or more palatable public face for white supremacy or white separatism and that it is an appeal to a larger audience in hopes of inciting more widespread racial violence. According to Joseph T. Roy of the Southern Poverty Law Center, white supremacists often circulate material on the internet and elsewhere that “portrays the groups not as haters, but as simple white pride civic groups concerned with social ills”. Philosopher David Ingram argues that “affirming 'black pride' is not equivalent to affirming 'white pride,' since the former—unlike the latter—is a defensive strategy aimed at rectifying a negative stereotype”. By contrast, then, “affirmations of white pride—however thinly cloaked as affirmations of ethnic pride—serve to mask and perpetuate white privilege”. In the same vein, Professor of Education at University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, Cris Mayo, characterizes white pride as “a politically distasteful goal, given that whiteness is not a personal or community identity, but has been a strategy to maintain inequities of privilege and power.” Political scientists Carol M. Swain and Russell Nieli, in their text on white nationalism, identify the idea of “white pride” as a relatively new phenomenon in the United States. They argue that over the course of the 1990s, “a new white pride, white protest, and white consciousness movement has developed in America”. They identify three contributing factors: an immigrant influx during the 1980s and 1990s, resentment over affirmative action policies, and the growth of the Internet as a tool for the expression and mobilization of grievances. According to Janet E. Helms, founding director of Boston College's Institute for the Study and Promotion of Race and Culture, a white person “must become aware of his or her Whiteness, accept it as personally and socially significant ... Not in the sense of Klan members' 'white pride' but in the context of a commitment to a just society.” Among people who strongly identify as white, research differentiates between a power cognizant group and a prideful group. The prideful group is more likely to devalue diversity and to show prejudice, while the power cognizant group is more likely to value diversity.

School Pride - References - Netflix