Sarah Off the Grid - Netflix

Step inside Sarah's life with husband Alex and co-conspirator Tommy, as they attempt to build an off the grid dream home from the ground up for her most important client ever: her family. With unparalleled access to the "behind the scenes" Sarah, the stakes couldn't be higher as she takes on her biggest challenge yet. With guest appearances from Mike Holmes Sr. and Jr., it's a race of time and money to complete the build on schedule on a remote piece of property while Sarah juggles the demands of running a design business in Toronto and raising two kids.

Sarah Off the Grid - Netflix

Type: Reality

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2017-09-10

Sarah Off the Grid - Crossword - Netflix

A crossword is a word puzzle that usually takes the form of a square or a rectangular grid of white-and black-shaded squares. The game's goal is to fill the white squares with letters, forming words or phrases, by solving clues, which lead to the answers. In languages that are written left-to-right, the answer words and phrases are placed in the grid from left to right and from top to bottom. The shaded squares are used to separate the words or phrases.

Sarah Off the Grid - Cryptic crosswords - Netflix

In cryptic crosswords, the clues are puzzles in themselves. A typical clue contains both a definition at the beginning or end of the clue and wordplay, which provides a way to manufacture the word indicated by the definition, and which may not parse logically. Cryptics usually give the length of their answers in parentheses after the clue, which is especially useful with multi-word answers. Certain signs indicate different forms of wordplay. Solving cryptics is harder to learn than standard crosswords, as learning to interpret the different types of cryptic clues can take some practice. In Great Britain and throughout much of the Commonwealth, cryptics of varying degrees of difficulty are featured in many newspapers. There are several types of wordplay used in cryptics. One is straightforward definition substitution using parts of a word. For example, in one puzzle by Mel Taub, the answer IMPORTANT is given the clue “To bring worker into the country may prove significant”. The explanation is that to import means “to bring into the country”, the “worker” is a worker ant, and “significant” means important. Here, “significant” is the straight definition (appearing here at the end of the clue), “to bring worker into the country” is the wordplay definition, and “may prove” serves to link the two. Note that in a cryptic clue, there is almost always only one answer that fits both the definition and the wordplay, so that when one sees the answer, one knows that it is the right answer—although it can sometimes be a challenge to figure out why it is the right answer. A good cryptic clue should provide a fair and exact definition of the answer, while at the same time being deliberately misleading. Another type of wordplay used in cryptics is the use of homophones. For example, the clue “A few, we hear, add up (3)” is the clue for SUM. The straight definition is “add up”, meaning “totalize”. The solver must guess that “we hear” indicates a homophone, and so a homophone of a synonym of “A few” (“some”) is the answer. Other words relating to sound or hearing can be used to signal the presence of a homophone clue (e.g., “aloud”, “audibly”, “in conversation”, etc.). The double meaning is commonly used as another form of wordplay. For example, “Cat's tongue (7)” is solved by PERSIAN, since this is a type of cat, as well as a tongue, or language. This is the only type of cryptic clue without wordplay—both parts of the clue are a straight definition. Cryptics often include anagrams, as well. The clue “Ned T.'s seal cooked is rather bland (5,4)” is solved by NEEDS SALT. The straight definition is “is rather bland”, and the word “cooked” is a hint to the solver that this clue is an anagram (the letters have been “cooked”, or jumbled up). Ignoring all punctuation, “Ned T.'s seal” is an anagram for NEEDS SALT. Besides “cooked”, other common hints that the clue contains an anagram are words such as “scrambled”, “mixed up”, “confused”, “baked”, or “twisted”. Embedded words are another common trick in cryptics. The clue “Bigotry aside, I'd take him (9)” is solved by APARTHEID. The straight definition is “bigotry”, and the wordplay explains itself, indicated by the word “take” (since one word “takes” another): “aside” means APART and I'd is simply ID, so APART and ID “take” HE (which is, in cryptic crossword usage, a perfectly good synonym for “him”). The answer could be elucidated as APART(HE)ID. Another common clue type is the “hidden clue” or “container”, where the answer is hidden in the text of the clue itself. For example, “Made a dug-out, buried, and passed away (4)” is solved by DEAD. The answer is written in the clue: “maDE A Dug-out”. “Buried” indicates that the answer is embedded within the clue. There are numerous other forms of wordplay found in cryptic clues. Backwards words can be indicated by words like “climbing”, “retreating”, or “ascending” (depending on whether it is an across clue or a down clue) or by directional indicators such as “going North” (meaning upwards) or “West” (right-to-left); letters can be replaced or removed with indicators such as “nothing rather than excellence” (meaning replace E in a word with O); the letter I can be indicated by “me” or “one;” the letter O can be indicated by “nought”, “nothing”, “zero”, or “a ring” (since it visually resembles one); the letter X might be clued as “a cross”, or “ten” (as in the Roman numeral), or “an illiterate's signature”, or “sounds like your old flame” (homophone for “ex”). “Senselessness” is solved by “e”, because “e” is what remains after removing (less) “ness” from “sense”. With the different types of wordplay and definition possibilities, the composer of a cryptic puzzle is presented with many different possible ways to clue a given answer. Most desirable are clues that are clean but deceptive, with a smooth surface reading (that is, the resulting clue looks as natural a phrase as possible). The Usenet newsgroup rec.puzzles.crosswords has a number of clueing competitions where contestants all submit clues for the same word and a judge picks the best one. In principle, each cryptic clue is usually sufficient to define its answer uniquely, so it should be possible to answer each clue without use of the grid. In practice, the use of checks is an important aid to the solver.

Sarah Off the Grid - References - Netflix