Project Nazi: The Blueprints of Evil - Netflix

Project Nazi: The Blueprints of Evil delves into the construction of Nazi Germany, closely examining the propaganda, posters and products used to propel Hitler into a state of absolute power.

Project Nazi: The Blueprints of Evil - Netflix

Type: Documentary

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2017-08-09

Project Nazi: The Blueprints of Evil - Political views of Adolf Hitler - Netflix

The political views of Adolf Hitler have presented historians and biographers with some difficulty. His writings and methods were often adapted to need and circumstance, although there were some steady themes, including anti-semitism, anti-communism, anti-parliamentarianism, German Lebensraum (“living space”), belief in the superiority of an “Aryan race” and an extreme form of German nationalism. Hitler personally claimed he was fighting against Jewish Marxism. Hitler's political views were formed during three periods: (1) His years as a poverty-stricken young man in Vienna and Munich prior to World War I, during which he turned to nationalist-oriented political pamphlets and antisemitic newspapers out of distrust for mainstream newspapers and political parties; (2) The closing months of World War I when Germany lost the war; Hitler is said to have developed his extreme nationalism during this time, desiring to “save” Germany from both external and internal “enemies” who, in his view, betrayed it; (3) The 1920s, during which his early political career began and he wrote Mein Kampf. Hitler formally renounced his Austrian citizenship on 7 April 1925, but did not acquire German citizenship until almost seven years later; thereby allowing him to run for public office. Hitler was influenced by Benito Mussolini who was appointed Prime Minister of Italy in October 1922 after his “March on Rome”. In many ways, Adolf Hitler epitomizes “the force of personality in political life” as mentioned by Friedrich Meinecke. He was essential to the very framework of Nazism's political appeal and its manifestation in Germany. So important were Hitler's views that they immediately affected the political policies of Nazi Germany. He asserted the Führerprinzip (“Leader principle”). The principle relied on absolute obedience of all subordinates to their superiors. Hitler viewed the party structure and later the government structure as a pyramid, with himself—the infallible leader—at the apex. Hitler firmly believed that the force of “will” was decisive in determining the political course for a nation and rationalized his actions accordingly. Given that Hitler was appointed “leader of the German Reich for life”, he “embodied the supreme power of the state and, as the delegate of the German people”, it was his role to determine the “outward form and structure of the Reich”. To that end, Hitler's political motivation consisted of an ideology that combined traditional German and Austrian anti-Semitism with an intellectualized racial doctrine resting on an admixture of bits and pieces of social Darwinism and the ideas – mostly obtained second-hand and only partially understood – of Friedrich Nietzsche, Arthur Schopenhauer, Richard Wagner, Houston Stewart Chamberlain, Arthur de Gobineau and Alfred Rosenberg, as well as Paul de Lagarde, Georges Sorel, Alfred Ploetz and others.

Project Nazi: The Blueprints of Evil - Social conservatism - Netflix

Another area of concern for Hitler and which was mentioned by his childhood companion in Vienna, August Kubizek, was prostitution - which Hitler associated with venereal disease and cultural decline. Moreover, Hitler found the practice counter to proper family development and displayed a puritanical view in Mein Kampf, writing:

Hitler raved against what he considered to be tasteless and morally destructive art on display throughout Germany in Mein Kampf, calling some of it morbid and declaring that “people would have benefited by not visiting them at all.” Convinced that it was necessary to show the German people what comprised, “degenerate art” so as to protect them in the future, Hitler arranged for a formally commissioned exhibit in July 1937 of specially selected carvings, sculptures, and paintings. Once the exhibit was at an end, selected artist's works were banned from Nazi Germany. Well known was Hitler's vehement opposition to racial-mixing; he also believed as did other Pan-Germans that Germans had an obligation to procreate:

Project Nazi: The Blueprints of Evil - References - Netflix