Drag Queens of London - Netflix

This eight part docusoap celebrates and showcases the diversity and dynamism of the London's drag scene, with plenty of glitzy and glamorous performances as well as revealing the stories behind the performer as the war paint comes off. These courageous and colourful characters have a lot on their plate and we see them triumph against the odds to forge careers, find love and make their lives as both drag queens and real men in the capital.

Drag Queens of London - Netflix

Type: Documentary

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 45 minutes

Premier: 2014-04-22

Drag Queens of London - Drag king - Netflix

Drag kings are mostly female performance artists who dress in masculine drag and personify male gender stereotypes as part of an individual or group routine. They may be lesbian, bisexual, transgender, genderqueer, or otherwise part of the LGBT community. A typical drag show may incorporate dancing, acting, stand-up comedy, and singing, either live or lip-synching to pre-recorded tracks. Drag kings often perform as exaggeratedly macho male characters, portray marginalized masculinities such as construction workers, rappers, or they will impersonate male celebrities like Elvis Presley, Michael Jackson, and Tim McGraw. In the late 1800s and early 1900s, several drag kings became British music hall stars, and British pantomime has preserved the tradition of women performing in male roles. Starting in the mid-1990s, drag kings started to gain some of the fame and attention that drag queens have known.

Drag Queens of London - Drag community - Netflix

Unlike drag queens, who pride themselves on making individual names for themselves and creating a “lineage,” drag kings tend to form troupes or performance groups. While they may join houses and maintain a solo persona, this is increasingly rare in the drag king community. Many troupes are created out of the desire to forge a cohesive unit in order to book shows and performances. However, there are more and more drag kings now branching away from the troupe stereotypes, and performing individually. Drag king shows are becoming easier to find in this century and individual kings are getting bookings outside of the 'king shows' and finally sharing the stages with their male counterparts, the queens. Drag kings are largely a phenomenon of lesbian culture and can most often be seen at lesbian bars or festivals. However, not all drag kings are lesbians, and some participants in the drag king subculture are not otherwise involved in lesbian culture, society, or politics. Drag kings are a diverse group, making difficult to find something universal that all drag kings have in common. By performing masculinity on the non-cisgender male body, these performers are resisting society's notions of the gender binary. Some transmen also self-identify as drag kings. Faux queens (also called femme queens, femme performers, bio queens or Kittens) often perform alongside drag kings and may or may not be lesbian-identified. A British lesbian cabaret organization called Lesburlesque made it part of their mission to promote drag kings on the wider British cabaret circuit. Their founder Pixie Truffle gave an interview to the Guardian newspaper in the United Kingdom on her desire for drag kings to close the gap with queens and with male stand-up comedians. Similar to some drag queens who prefer to be seen as actors—like Justin Bond and Lypsinka—some drag kings prefer not to be pigeon-holed by the drag king label. “I think when people assume that somebody is queer, or different, or trans, they always want to put something before their name,” said Murray Hill in an interview. “And that is what drag king has been. Why can't you just call me a comedian like Jerry Seinfeld is called a comedian?” The International Drag King Community Extravaganza (IDKE) is the largest yearly gatherings of drag performers aimed at celebrating gender performance and exploration of gender issues, now in its ninth year. Delegates from various troupes throughout America, Canada and Europe congregate at IDKE to perform and engage in discussion and debate at a series of workshops organized by the host city under the guidance of the IDKE Board. A different city hosts this event each year, selected by the board. It is city's responsibility to create a website.

The oldest and possibly largest drag king contest in the world takes place in San Francisco, California. The San Francisco Drag King Contest has been called “A parade of gender-bending eye candy” by SF Weekly and the producer of the show is community activist and performer Lu Read, a.k.a. Fudgie Frottage. The SFDK has the fortunate luck to have the Drag King Sensations, Momma's Boyz, perform every year while judges deliberate. The Momma's Boyz always ensure they are not on the road at that time so they can donate their talent to this critical event. Another yearly gathering was the now defunct, or at least temporarily so, The Great Big International Drag King Show in Washington, D.C., created by Ken Vegas, who is also founder of the DC Kings. In recent years, some drag king performers have adopted other terms to describe their own performance styles, particularly if they deviate from the more traditional forms of “kinging.” Common names include “gender blurring” acknowledge the merging of both male and female traits in the performances while Vancouver performer Rose Butch adopted the ambiguous label “drag thing.” Long-time performer Flare called the stage of drag king styles that emerged in Toronto's scene in the mid-2010s as “unicorn drag.”

Drag Queens of London - References - Netflix