A Spot of Science - Netflix

Viewers ask their craziest science questions, then it's up to Gus Sorola and Chris Demarais to match wits with evolutionary biologist Sally Le Page in search of an answer. No science theory is too dumb, but someone on this panel probably is. (It's Chris.)

A Spot of Science - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 15 minutes

Premier: 2017-01-28

A Spot of Science - Hotspot (geology) - Netflix

In geology, the places known as hotspots or hot spots are volcanic regions thought to be fed by underlying mantle that is anomalously hot compared with the surrounding mantle. Their position on the Earth's surface is independent of tectonic plate boundaries. There are two hypotheses that attempt to explain their origins. One suggests that hotspots are due to mantle plumes that rise as thermal diapirs from the core–mantle boundary. The other hypothesis is that lithospheric extension permits the passive rising of melt from shallow depths. This hypothesis considers the term “hotspot” to be a misnomer, asserting that the mantle source beneath them is, in fact, not anomalously hot at all. Well-known examples include the Hawaii, Iceland and Yellowstone hotspots.

A Spot of Science - Comparison with island arc volcanoes - Netflix

Hotspot volcanoes are considered to have a fundamentally different origin from island arc volcanoes. The latter form over subduction zones, at converging plate boundaries. When one oceanic plate meets another, the denser plate is forced downward into a deep ocean trench. This plate, as it is subducted, releases water into the base of the over-riding plate, and this water mixes with the rock, thus changing its composition causing some rock to melt and rise. It is this that fuels a chain of volcanoes, such as the Aleutian Islands, near Alaska.

A Spot of Science - References - Netflix